COVID-19 Dashboard: Spring 2022

LVC tracks the status of COVID-19 in our campus community during each academic semester. Data is updated here every Thursday by noon during the spring 2022 semester beginning Thursday, Jan. 6.

If you are fully vaccinated, use this form to upload images of your vaccine card.

Where to get vaccinated in PA.

StudentsEmployees
Number of COVID-19 tests
administered on-campus
9568
Positive510
Negative9058
Awaiting Result00
Recovered On-Campus500
Number of COVID-19 tests
administered off-campus (as reported to the College; total August 30)
11764
Positive10737
Negative1027
Awaiting Result00
Recovered Off-Campus10537
Number isolating on-campus  10
Number isolating off-campus (as reported to the College)00
Number quarantining01

Visit here to access the LVC symptom tracker.

When should I use the symptom tracker?

You should complete the symptom tracker—even if you have been vaccinated—when:

  1. You have illness symptoms,
  2. You’ve been exposed to someone with COVID-19,
  3. You’ve tested positive for COVID-19, or
  4. You’ve had any type of COVID-19 test done off-campus in the past two weeks.

Your symptom tracker responses go directly to Shroyer Health Center staff for nurse triage. Staff or someone from LVC’s contact tracing team will call you within 24 hours if additional details are needed.

Guidelines for completing the symptom tracker:

If you are NOT VACCINATED and have symptoms or have been exposed to someone who tested positive for COVID-19—

*Immediately start to self-quarantine: do not attend in-person classes, athletic practices, or any activities. Wait for a call from a Shroyer Health Center staff member or an LVC contact tracing team member for additional instruction.

*Inform your professors, coaches, and LVC employer that you will not be able to attend class, practice, or work.

*Call 911 or go to the emergency room if you have emergency health needs.

*Contact the Shroyer Health Center at 717-867-6232, ext. 6231, or healthservices@lvc.edu if you require non-urgent medical assistance during business hours.

*Use Penn State Health OnDemand if you require non-urgent medical assistance during evenings or on weekends. You also can visit a local urgent care center.

*Call the Office of Public Safety at 717-867-6111 or ext. 6111 with any other questions during evenings or on weekends.

If you are VACCINATED and have symptoms or tested positive for COVID-19—

*Immediately self-isolate and wait for a call from Shroyer Health Center staff member or an LVC contact tracing team member for additional instructions.

*Inform your professors, coaches, and LVC employer that you will not be able to attend class, practice, or work.

*Call 911 or go to the emergency room if you have emergency health needs.

*Contact the Shroyer Health Center at 717-867-6232, ext. 6231, or healthservices@lvc.edu if you require non-urgent medical assistance during business hours.

*Use Penn State Health OnDemand if you require non-urgent medical assistance during evenings or on weekends. You also can visit a local urgent care center.

*Call the Office of Public Safety at 717-867-6111 or ext. 6111 with any other questions during evenings or on weekends.

If you are vaccinated and have been exposed, but have NOT tested positive and DO NOT have any symptoms—

*Continue in-person classes and activities. A Shroyer Health Center nurse may contact you for additional details so that proper documentation can occur. However, no self-quarantine is required at this time.

*Complete the symptom tracker again if you are vaccinated and begin to have symptoms.

Isolation or Quarantine Information

Any student who misses class due to isolation or quarantine, whether vaccinated or not, should inform their professors and coaches that they will not attend class or practice in person, and arrange to complete assignments, etc. on time.

Residential Students—please remain in your room except to use the bathroom or go outside for fresh air. Follow all safety protocols including vigilant physical distancing, consistent mask-wearing, and frequent hand washing.

Commuters and Employees—please remain in your home except to go outside for fresh air. Follow all safety protocols including vigilant physical distancing, consistent mask-wearing, and frequent hand washing.  

All—do not go to work or socialize with friends or family outside your immediate household or roommate(s). A member of our contact tracing team will provide guidance to your roommate(s) on whether they should quarantine.

Do not end your isolation or quarantine unless directed to do so by Shroyer Health Center staff or your LVC contact tracer. They will provide your end date and any changes that may occur when reviewing your situation. 

*Call 911 or go to the emergency room if you have emergency health needs.

*Contact the Shroyer Health Center at 717-867-6232, ext. 6231, or healthservices@lvc.edu if you require non-urgent medical assistance during business hours.

*Use Penn State Health OnDemand if you require non-urgent medical assistance during evenings or on weekends. You also can visit a local urgent care center.

What counts as close contact

*You were within six feet of someone who has COVID-19 for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over 24 hours
*You had direct physical contact with the person (hugged or kissed them)
*You shared eating or drinking utensils or gathered to eat meals
*You rode in a car together
*You share a bedroom and/or bathroom space with the person
*Close contact can occur up to two days before a person becomes symptomatic
*These criteria are applicable even if both individuals were masked in some cases; contact tracing will determine if a contact meets the criteria.

Contact tracing is the process of identifying close contacts of laboratory-confirmed or probable COVID-19 patients. Contact tracers are trained and keep your information confidential. Please respond promptly and honestly if a contact tracer calls you. Vaccinated individuals may be interviewed or guided by contact tracing team members. Contact tracing is crucial in helping LVC identify new cases of COVID-19 and prevent further spread. 

Employees: Do not report to campus. Self-quarantine and consult a physician for further evaluation. Please report any additional information to your department and human resources.

Please email information@lvc.edu or call 717-867-6555 if you have any questions regarding LVC’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vaccine Clinic on Campus-Feb. 18

We are partnering with WellSpan Health to host a vaccine clinic on on Feb. 18. Students, employees, and employee families can receive a first, second, or booster dose of Pfizer. We must have at least 15 registered individuals by Friday, Feb. 4, to host the clinic. Sign up on Redbook.

Spring 2022 Textbooks

Dear Students,

Please see the following information regarding Spring 2022 textbooks if you will be studying remotely from home during the first two weeks of this semester.

College Store

*Textbooks ordered from the College Store (Barnes and Noble) before Jan. 4 can be shipped to your home address at the College’s expense or can be picked up at the College Store (hours below). Please email Cristal Acevedo-Klein at acevedo@lvc.edu with your order number and  mailing address if you wish to have the textbooks mailed. You can also contact her at 717-867-6313 with any questions or concerns. The College Store will NOT automatically ship these items without a student request.

Hours—Monday through Friday, Jan. 10-14, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 15, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

*Textbooks ordered from the College Store (Barnes and Noble) on or after Jan. 4 can be shipped to your home address at your expense or can be picked up at the College Store (hours below). The shipping charge will be $8.99 and will be applied to your student account. Please email Cristal Acevedo-Klein at acevedo@lvc.edu with your order number and mailing address if you wish to have the textbooks mailed. You can also contact her at 717-867-6313 with any questions or concerns. The College Store will NOT automatically ship these items without a student request.

Campus Mail Room

 *Textbooks ordered from an external vendor (i.e., Chegg, Amazon, etc.) and shipped to campus can be picked up in the College Mail Room (lower level of the Humanities Building) next week (hours below). Students studying remotely from home can email mailservices@lvc.edu to have their textbooks shipped to their home address if they are unable to pick up them up in person. The College will NOT automatically ship these items without a student request. 

Hours—Monday through Friday, Jan. 10-14, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Remote Start to Spring 2022 Semester

Dear Students, 

Given the regional surge in COVID-19 infections and the transmissibility of the omicron variant, LVC will begin Spring 2022 semester courses remotely for two weeks, starting January 17. The College made this decision in consultation with Penn State Health in the hopes that infections will be on a downward trajectory by the end of the month. However, we will continue to monitor the situation closely and make further adjustments as necessary.

*In-person classes are now set to begin January 31. (Note: Provost Cowart is working with health professions programs that have a pedagogical need for some students to begin in-person learning January 17. If you are a health professions student or an education student with a teaching placement, please look for messages from your program director or chair.) 

*Students—residential and commuter—should delay their return to campus until January 30. Those who need to return earlier than January 30 must complete this Request for Early Move-In form by Thursday, January 6, at 4 p.m. Exemptions will be granted on a case-by-case basis for students with exceptional circumstances. 

*Student-athletes will be contacted by their coaches with their report dates. 

*Vaccinations and boosters are highly effective in mitigating the spread and severity of COVID-19, even the latest omicron variant. In fact, the majority of those hospitalized and critically ill are unvaccinated. Higher vaccination and booster rates maximize our ability to return to and sustain in-person learning. 

*Any student who has reported being boosted will be entered into a weekly drawing for a $100 gift card starting January 17 and continuing through the end of the semester. Report being fully vaccinated or boosted here. Please get your flu shot as well.  

*The CDC has made changes to its quarantine and isolation recommendations. Students who have received their boosters or have completed the primary series of Pfizer or Moderna vaccine within the last five (Pfizer) or six (Moderna) months or have completed the primary series of J&J vaccine in the last two months will not be required to quarantine if exposed to someone who tests positive.* Otherwise, you will be required to quarantine if you are a contact of someone testing positive. 

Upon your return to campus: 

*We will not require re-entry testing. However, we encourage you to get tested before your planned return. If you have symptoms of an illness, delay your return to campus until you are well. 

*If you are experiencing symptoms of any illness—even if it is a sniffle and even if you are fully vaccinated, fill out the Daily Symptom Tracker in MyLVC. Shroyer Health Center staff will contact you. DO NOT visit Shroyer without an appointment, and please do not visit an urgent care center in lieu of seeing the healthcare professionals at Shroyer. 

*Please wear surgical masks, N95s, or cloth masks of at least three layers. Universal indoor masking will continue, including in residence halls. Residential students are required to mask up inside residence halls. The only exception is when roommates are inside their room with no other visitors. 

*Please follow all masking, testing, isolation, and quarantining guidelines. Contact tracing and surveillance testing of unvaccinated individuals will continue. Those who do not comply will be subject to disciplinary action under the student conduct code. 

*Classroom distancing of at least three feet will continue. Practice social distancing of at least six feet whenever possible. 

*If it is determined that you must isolate or quarantine, you may be required to go home until you are cleared to return to campus. 

Contact information@lvc.edu if you have questions. 

Thank you for your flexibility and understanding.  

President MacLaren 
*Please check the CDC and FDA websites for the latest information about vaccination protocols and timelines for your age group.

Important COVID-19 Update

LVC Community: 

We have so far this semester fared exceptionally well in preventing COVID-19 infections among our students and employees. Indoor masking, contact tracing, high immunization rates, and compliance with quarantining and isolation have worked and allowed us to have an in-person semester.  

However, positivity rates and cases are rising on campus and in Lebanon County as people gather indoors more often during the colder weather and the efficacy of the vaccine has been found to decrease over time. Our partners at Penn State Health have reported that hospitalizations, especially among unvaccinated individuals, are “going in the wrong direction.” Even if your symptoms feel like a mild cold, you could be spreading COVID-19 to vulnerable people at risk of experiencing much worse symptoms. 

There are just a few weeks to go. I urge you to: 

Be aware of new symptoms. Colds, allergies, and sniffles are prevalent this time of year. Even mild cold-like symptoms or nausea could be a sign of COVID-19 infection. Students must fill out the symptom tracker any time they experience symptoms. This alerts health center staff to get in touch. 

If you have any of these symptoms, isolate yourself, regardless of vaccination status. If you experience any of the following symptoms, contact your healthcare provider (employees) or Shroyer Health Center (students) at x.6232, 717-867-6232, or healthservices@lvc.edu.  

  • Fever or chills 
  • Cough 
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing 
  • New loss of taste or smell 

Also contact your healthcare provider or Shroyer if you experience more than one of the following symptoms: 

  • Congestion or runny nose 
  • Fatigue 
  • Muscle or body aches 
  • Headache 
  • Diarrhea
  • Sore throat 
  • Nausea or vomiting 

Anyone who has a medical emergency should go to the ER or call 911. Students may call public safety for assistance at x.6111 or 717-867-6111. 

Get your COVID-19 booster shot. Boosters are widely available to and recommended for anyone 18 and older who finished both shots of either Pfizer and Moderna six months ago or got a Johnson & Johnson vaccine two months ago. Vaccines and booster shots are critical even for those who have had COVID-19. Your immunity wanes 90 days after infection. 

Get your flu shot. Flu season has already begun in our region. You can get flu and COVID-19 vaccines and boosters at the same time. 

Stay vigilant about indoor masking. Masks are proven to reduce the number of droplets significantly, thus lessening the viral load and the risk of infection.  

Be cautious over these holiday breaks. Mask up when gathering with people outside of your family unit. Avoid large gatherings, parties, bars, and clubs. 

Rest up and enjoy your break so we can head into finals healthy and strong—together. 

President MacLaren 

Vaccine Safety and Science—Q&A with Dr. Courtney Lappas

The Key to Normality

June 2, 2021

As LVC prepares for the upcoming academic year, Ali Wenger, content strategist at LVC, talked with Dr. Courtney Lappas, professor of biology with expertise in immunology and molecular biology, about COVID vaccines.

What would you say is the most important fact(s) for people to know about the safety of the vaccines?

First, I would say that as is the case with any drug or vaccine, it is completely normal and prudent to think about safety. The great news is that all evidence indicates that the three COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized for use in the U.S. are remarkably safe. The dangers of COVID-19 are much, much greater than any vaccine side effect. Almost 600,000 people in the U.S. have died from COVID-19 to date. So far, approximately 300 million doses of vaccine have been administered in the U.S. alone. Many people have experienced no side effects. The most common side effects are temporary and minor—things such as pain at the injection site, fatigue, muscle aches, etc. There have been very, very rare occurrences of allergic reactions, as is the case with almost every vaccine, but even these reactions are treatable and temporary.  

Most people are probably aware that a very, very rare blood clotting disorder has been linked to the Johnson and Johnson vaccine. The important thing to realize about this observation is that the risk of blood clots resulting from the J&J vaccine is exceedingly low—very significantly lower than the risk of blood clots resulting from remaining unvaccinated and contracting COVID-19. 

Some people might be concerned about potential long-term side effects of the mRNA vaccines in particular—the Pfizer and Moderna shots. Rumors have been circulating about potential effects on fertility, cognitive function, etc. Thankfully, there is no scientific reason for concern. If any side effects are going to occur because of vaccination, they generally happen within six weeks of receiving a vaccine dose. There are no documented reports of delayed side effects of vaccination, in other words, side effects that first show up many months or years after vaccination. It might help people to know that the components of the mRNA vaccines are completely cleared from the human body very rapidly—within days. The mRNA in the vaccines cannot change your DNA, and it will not persist in your cells.

Finally, the safety of the vaccines currently approved for use in the U.S. has been thoroughly investigated. No “shortcuts” were taken in the clinical trials or approval process. 

How established is the science behind the vaccines? Has it been used in other vaccines that are more common?

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are the first mRNA-based vaccines to be deployed. However, the technology has been studied for decades and is very well characterized and understood. The Johnson and Johnson vaccine uses a different technology—it is an adenovirus-based vaccine, which is what some folks might think of as a more “traditional” vaccine. The adenovirus vaccine platform has also been studied for decades—most recently in vaccine trials in response to the Ebola and Zika outbreaks.  

Although some people might wonder if the development of these three vaccines was rushed, it is important to remember that the reason the vaccines could be developed so rapidly is because the technology was already so well established. This is a real scientific success story in which technologies that had been studied for decades were applied to a public health crisis as it unfolded. We can all feel very confident about the science behind the vaccines.    

How does one person getting vaccinated benefit our community?

Currently, more than half of the population in the U.S has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and this number continues to grow. This is great news, and it indicates that most people in the U.S. believe getting vaccinated is the right thing to do. This vaccination rate is directly linked to the very significant decrease in COVID-19 cases and deaths nationwide. However, we need even more people to join their friends, neighbors, and classmates in receiving their vaccination so that the virus will not have the chance to mutate and potentially undo all the progress that has been made.  Everyone who gets vaccinated protects not only themselves but also everyone they interact with. And we must remember that we are truly in this together. Children younger than 12 currently cannot receive a vaccine, immunocompromised individuals may not be protected even after vaccination. Unvaccinated individuals may unknowingly transmit the virus to these vulnerable populations. Every additional vaccine administered reduces these risks.  

From a scientific point of view, what are the benefits of a vaccinated community?

The benefits of a vaccinated community are immense. Simply put, vaccination is the path back to normality. At LVC, a vaccinated community would allow us to gather once again in classes, sporting events, concerts, and parties without many of the strict precautions that have been in place for the past year. Vaccination of the LVC campus also protects the surrounding community—the younger siblings, children, parents, and grandparents of our community members. 

What else do you think is important for people to know about the vaccine?

The COVID-19 vaccines are remarkably safe and effective and are the culmination of decades of scientific and medical research. Getting vaccinated will protect you and the people around you and allow a return to normality. Vaccination has long been regarded by many as the single most important public health measure to which we can all contribute, and each individual who receives the COVID-19 vaccine contributes to the overall health and welfare of the community.  

Let LVC Know You Have Been Vaccinated

Submit your vaccination confirmation after you have received the second dose of the vaccine. You will need to upload an image of your valid vaccination card.

Commencement Masking Recommendations

Dear Colleagues, 

Commencement activities are just two weeks away. In the past few weeks, many soon-to-be graduates have expressed their desire for the ceremony to be mask-optional; I know that others, out of concern for themselves and their loved ones, would like us to require masking. The College leadership team and I wanted to wait until closer to the event to review data on community levels and CDC recommendations before changing masking requirements for this large, indoor event. Per the CDC website, the COVID-19 Community Level in Lebanon County and the counties surrounding it are Low. For counties with Low Community Levels, the CDC says, “People may choose to mask at any time.” Since the beginning of the pandemic, LVC has committed to following CDC guidelines. Therefore, we are changing the Commencement masking policy to mask-optional but highly recommended. 

*Attendees can help protect others by masking up. 
*If an at-home COVID-19 test is available to you, take one before Commencement. Anyone who tests positive must not attend the ceremony. 
*If you have any symptoms on the day of Commencement, do not attend. 
*If you are traveling to campus from a county with Medium or High Community Levels, mask up. 
*KN95 or N95 masks are the more effective options for those who choose to wear masks. 

I understand that some attendees will be uncomfortable or unhappy with this change in protocol. There are no easy answers. Frankly, it would be difficult to enforce a masking requirement, especially on such an emotional and meaningful day when students want to be photographed without masks, and when other large venues do not require masking.

I do, however, strongly encourage all attendees to mask up for the good of the whole community. I look forward to celebrating our students’ accomplishments. If you are unable to attend, look for photos and video on social media after the event.   

President MacLaren 

Policy on Remote Instruction for In-person Courses: Students

Dear LVC Students and Families,

Since the beginning of the pandemic, LVC has committed to following CDC guidelines in determining policies and practices. Per the CDC website, the COVID-19 Community Level in Lebanon County and most counties in which our students and employees reside have Low Community Levels. Therefore, the College has decided to return to pre-COVID-19 policies and practices concerning in-person courses.

Effective starting Summer 2022 and in subsequent terms, the following policies and practices will be in place regarding in-person courses:

1. Unless a course is designated as an online offering in the course schedule, it will occur in person.Students may not take in-person courses remotely, except if approved on a short-term basis (generally limited to three weeks) due to medical circumstances with appropriate documentation.If a student requires a short-term accommodation for remote learning, their circumstances will be evaluated by the appropriate office (e.g., Health Services, Accessibility Resources), and the Registrar’s Office will send a communication to instructors.2. Classrooms, labs, and other instructional spaces will return to normal distancing.

3. Masking indoors will remain optional but highly encouraged.

Please note that these policies are subject to modification if there is a significant change of circumstance regarding COVID-19 or another infectious disease. 

If you have any questions, please reply to this email, and an LVC staff member will be in touch.


Sincerely,
Dr. Monica Cowart, Provost

Policy on Remote Instruction for In-person Courses

Colleagues,

Since the beginning of the pandemic, LVC has committed to following CDC guidelines in determining policies and practices. Per the CDC website, the COVID-19 Community Level in Lebanon County and most counties in which our students and employees reside have Low Community Levels. Therefore, the College has decided to return to pre-COVID-19 policies and practices concerning in-person courses.

Effective starting Summer 2022 and in subsequent terms, the following policies and practices will be in place regarding in-person courses:

1. Unless a course is designated as an online offering in the course schedule, it will occur in person.Students may not take in-person courses remotely, except if approved on a short-term basis (generally limited to three weeks) due to medical circumstances with appropriate documentation. If a student requires a short-term accommodation for remote learning, their circumstances will be evaluated by the appropriate office (e.g., Health Services, Accessibility Resources), and the Registrar’s Office will send a communication to instructors.Faculty may not teach undergraduate courses remotely during fall and spring semesters, except if approved on a short-term basis (generally limited to three weeks) due to medical circumstances with appropriate documentation or approved in advance by the Provost/VPAA according to the College’s online/hybrid course policy. The policy allows for the following circumstances:The professor has expertise in a specific course and cannot teach fully on campus;There is a circumstance that prevents the course from meeting in person. For example: The professor is ill, injured, or otherwise unable to come to campus for an extended duration;Hybrid or online instruction has a compelling pedagogical benefit to the course. For example: an education course teaching online learning;The department, in the spirit of innovation and as a way of improving pedagogy, desires to offer a course or courses in hybrid/online format to evaluate and assess the effectiveness of this modality for the course or to compare the pedagogical effectiveness to the course’s in-person offering; orLimited other reasons at the sole discretion of the Provost/VPAA.2. Classrooms, labs, and other instructional spaces will return to normal distancing.

3. Masking indoors will remain optional but highly encouraged.

Please note that these policies are subject to modification if there is a significant change of circumstance regarding COVID-19 or another infectious disease.


Sincerely,
Provost Cowart

LVC to Go Mask Optional: Commencement Masking Policy Remains in Effect

President James M. MacLaren, Ph.D., shared the following important messages this morning. He separately noted that as of now Commencement attendees will be required to wear masks, but that College and its health partners will reevaluate the protocols closer to Commencement Weekend. 

1. Starting Monday, March 21, Lebanon Valley College will go mask optional. We made this decision in consultation with our Penn State Health advisors and based on the low COVID-19 infection rates in Lebanon County. 

Notes 

*Your professors may continue to require masking in classrooms, labs, and other learning spaces in which individuals are in proximity for extended periods. Continue to carry a mask with you, and please follow your professors’ requirements. The Student Conduct Code will apply to students who do not comply with professors’ masking requests. 

*Masks are optional in the residence halls, social spaces, and dining spaces. Use good judgment and be respectful of your peers.

*Masking will remain in place for LVC Live this Saturday since many people will visit campus from out of town.

*Please note that this policy is subject to change if infection rates rise or a new variant develops. 

2. Please join me next Thursday, March 24, at 7 p.m. on Zoom to learn about the results of our recent campus climate survey; progress made in diversity, equity, inclusion, and intercultural affairs; needs, and next steps. You will hear from Dr. Felicia Brown-Haywood, associate vice president of diversity, equity, inclusion, and institutional success. 

Regarding campus climate, I am deeply disappointed to learn of inappropriate Yik Yak posts targeting individuals and marginalized groups of students. Such comments are unacceptable and not in line with LVC’s values as an institution. As members of the LVC community, I urge you to treat all individuals with respect and care and live the values of Inclusive Excellence. There has been positive progress recently, and I know we can—we must—do better. 

*Please make a report here if you witness or experience a bias incident. If you are comfortable being contacted, a member of LVC’s Bias Response & Education Team will reach out to you to offer resources and support. 

*If you need personal support or a listening ear, I encourage you to contact Annesha Edwards-Carter, director of diversity, equity, inclusion, and intercultural affairs, at aedwards@lvc.edu or counseling services at counselingservices@lvc.edu. Your academic advisors, professors, and staff are here for you. 

President MacLaren