Archive for the ‘Faculty Scholarship’ Category.

Dr. Thomas Dompier Co-Authors Paper and Presents Series of Guest Lectures

Dr. Thomas Dompier, associate professor of athletic training, co-authored “Extremity Musculoskeletal Injury Risk After Concussion Recovery in High School Athletes,” which was published in the Journal of Athletic Training in November. That same month, he provided three guest lectures on “Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Medicine for Public Health Research Methods”—via WebEx—to students at the University of South Carolina, School of Public Health.

 

Lynall RC, Mauntel TC, Pohlig RT, Kerr ZY, Dompier TP, Hall EE, Buckley TA. Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injury Risk After Concussion Recovery in High School Athletes. J Athl Train. 2017 Nov; 52(11):1028-1034. PMID: 29140128

Dr. Sean Droms Presents at National Meeting in San Diego

Dr. Sean Droms, assistant professor of mathematics, gave a talk at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in San Diego, Calif., last week. Dr. Droms’ presentation, Reading Mathematics is a Learnable Skill, highlighted how the LVC Mathematical Sciences Department focuses on teaching transferable skills, particularly technical reading and communication.

Dr. Rachel Albert’s Collaborative Research Highlighted in Cornell Chronicle

Researchers learn the social function of babies’ babbling,” featuring work conducted by Dr. Rachel Albert, LVC assistant professor of psychology, was published in the Cornell Chronicle. Dr. Albert, who earned her Ph.D. from Cornell, performed the research with Dr. Jennifer Schwade, senior lecture in psychology at Cornell, and Dr. Michael Goldstein, associate professor of psychology at Cornell. According to the article, the scientists “recorded and recombined the vocalizations of 40 nine-month-olds and their mothers, using a ‘playback paradigm,’ widely used in animal studies, to assess how specific forms of sounds and actions by infants influenced parental behavior.”

 

Dr. Gary Grieve-Carlson’s Essay Published in War, Literature & the Arts

Inspired by Chloe McCarty ’18 and Noah Brady ’19, Dr. Gary Grieve-Carlson, professor of English, wrote “Telling the Truth about History: Tim O’Brien’s In the Lake of the Woods,” which was published in the most recent issue of the journal War, Literature & the Arts (Vol. 29, 2017), an online journal produced at the U.S. Air Force Academy. Dr. Grieve-Carlson’s work grew out of a First-Year Experience he taught in 2015 in which the class read O’Brien’s novel. McCarty and Brady’s essays and thoughtful questions prompted Dr. Grieve-Carlson to write this essay.

Dr. Rachel R. Albert Published in Development Science with Former Cornell Colleagues

The social functions of babbling: acoustic and contextual characteristics that facilitate maternal responsiveness,” co-authored by Dr. Rachel R. Albert, LVC assistant professor of psychology, and Dr. Jennifer A. Schwade and Dr. Michael H. Goldstein, co-directors of the Behavioral Analysis of Beginning Years (B.A.B.Y.) Laboratory at Cornell University, was published in Development Science, a leading journal in developmental psychology.

 

By having mothers react to audio-visual examples of babies babbling, the authors determined that vocal maturity and infant gaze influence how mothers perceive and respond to infant vocalizations. The researchers conclude that “An important function of prelinguistic vocalizing may be to elicit parental behavior in ways that facilitate the infant’s own learning about speech and language.”

Dr. Lou Manza Cited in New York Times

The New York Times included expert advice from Dr. Lou Manza, chair and professor of psychology, in “Can a Fitness Tracker Help You Run A Better Race.” Dr. Manza also happens to be an ultramarathoner.

 

Dr. Manza’s Piece Regarding the Death of Charles Manson Published Everywhere

Ok, not everywhere, but in quite a few media outlets… Dr. Lou Manza’s, chair and professor of psychology, recent article on Charles Manson – and his followers in particular – “Exploiting the Human Need for Emotional Comfort,” was published in numerous media outlets nationwide. Dr. Manza explored the connections between “Manson ‘family,’ such as Susan Atkins and Patricia Krenwinkel, and how they become drawn to leaders of cult-like organizations.”

 

 

Dr. Wendt Presents at International Conference in Texas

Dr. Holly M. Wendt, assistant professor of English, presented at the annual Council on International Education Exchange (CIEE) Conference in Austin, Texas, as part of the panel “Faculty Development: Bringing it Back to Campus” on Nov. 11. Dr. Wendt highlighted the ways in which they’ve used their experience as a participant in a CIEE International Faculty Development Seminar focused on the Camino de Santiago, a medieval pilgrimage route in Spain, to enrich their First Year Experience course, “Get Medieval On It.” The seminar, titled “Modern Debates Along an Ancient Way,” considered the role of the Camino de Santiago in medieval and modern literature, economics, faith, and visual culture.

What Heroin Sounds Like “Day of Making” Covered by Local TV Stations

A LVC student-faculty collaborative project established to raise awareness within the community about opioid addiction and to eliminate the stigma surrounding addiction was covered by three local television stations last Sunday. The event, “Day of Making,” brought people together to create works of art representing how they and their families have been affected by the epidemic. Their creative work was covered by FOX, ABC, and CBS and the work with be displayed in the Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery toward the end of March.

Adam Delmarcelle, adjunct instructor in art, and Mathew Samuel, LVC associate professor of digital communications, hosted the event, which was funded by an LVC grant.

 

Research Co-Authored by Dr. Stylianides Published in “Frontiers in Neuroscience”

Dr. Georgios A. Stylianides, associate professor of exercise science, co-authored a paper with colleagues from Qatar and France that was published in “Frontiers in Neuroscience.” He conducted the research on Session–RPE Method for Training Load Monitoring: Validity, Ecological Usefulness, and Influencing Factors with colleagues from Qatar University, University of Lyon, FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence, and Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital.

 

Haddad, M., Stylianides, G., Djaoui, L., Dellal, A., & Chamari, K. (2017, November 2). Session-RPE method for training load monitoring: Validity, ecological usefulness, and influencing factors. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 11(612).