Posts tagged ‘Criminal Justice’

Nearly 20 Criminal Justice and Sociology Majors Present Research at Regional Conference

Dr. Barbara Prince, assistant professor of sociology, announced that 19 criminal justice and sociology majors, many of whom have second majors, presented their yearlong scholarly research projects at the Mid-Atlantic Undergraduate Social Research Conference. More than 60 undergraduates from 18 regional colleges and universities participated in the conference. The LVC student names and presentation titles were:

  • Living in a Social World: The Effects of Social Connectedness and Work Type on General Happiness by Courtney Metz ’23, sociology
  • Looking Deeper in the Mind: The Effects of Social Connectedness and Satisfaction with Social Life on Mental Health by Katie Fair ’23, sociology
  • Shining a Light on Policing: The Effects of Race and Political Ideology on Policing Attitudes by Dylan Ruhl ’22, criminal justice and history
  • Understanding Police Use of Force: The Effects of Race and Sex on Views of Police Use of Force by Hunter LeRoux ’23, criminal justice
  • A Crisis, a Natural Event, or a Hoax?: The Effects of Political Views and Religiosity on Environmental Attitudes by Amber Arnold ’22, criminal justice and Spanish
  • Getting High on Racism: The Effects of Racial Prejudice on Views on Marijuana Legalization by Bryan Gower ’23, criminal justice and psychology
  • Suffering from Weight Change and Mental Strain? Maybe COVID is to Blame: The Effects of Health, Sex, and Views of the Seriousness of COVID19 by Ryan Stroh ’22, sociology
  • Law and Order: The Effects of The Media and Race on Perceptions of Policing by Jake Abruzzese ’23, criminal justice
  • Thought Police: The Effects of Race and Political Ideology on Views of Police Use of Force by Benjamin Tressler ’23, criminal justice
  • The Grass That Broke the Country’s Back: The Effects of Ideal Number of Children and Attitudes Toward Government Spending on Drug Rehabilitation on Views of Legalization of Marijuana by Amanda Keller ’23 criminal justice
  • There is No Planet B: The Effects of Age, Sex, and Environmental Effects on Neighborhoods on Attitudes Towards the Environment by Kylie Beagell ’22, sociology
  • An Eye for an Eye: The Effects of Political Ideology, Sex and Educational Attainment on Views of the Death Penalty as a Punishment for Murder by Emma Conradi ’23, criminal justice
  • Till Death Do Us Part: The Effects of Ideal Number of Children and Education on Marital Happiness by Jade Julius ’23, sociology
  • Let’s Talk About Sex: The Effects of Age and Views of Sex Education on Views of Teen Sex by Paige Vennie ’22, business administration and sociology
  • Staying Safe: The Effects of Sexual Orientation and Political Views on Views of Sex Education in Public Schools by Sidney Wike ’23, criminal justice
  • Guns Under Fire: The Effects of Political Ideology and Sex on Views of Gun Control by Tim Convery ’23, criminal justice
  • The Ultimate Punishment: The Effects of Sex and Political Views on Views of the Death Penalty by Abigail Radcliffe ’23, criminal justice
  • Gun Control Based on Worldview: The Effects of Religious Affiliation, Religiosity, and Spirituality on Views of Gun Control by Colin Krieg ’23, criminal justice
  • Shadow of Death: The Effects of Religiosity and Spirituality on Views of the Death Penalty by Hannah McCurdy ’22, criminal justice

Dr. Manza Presents at EPA Conference

Dr. Lou Manza, chair and professor of psychology, presented “Grit: Connections to Self-Esteem, Self-Worth, Cognitive Processing, and Aging” at the 2022 Eastern Psychological Association Conference in New York City during spring break. Dr. Manza’s presentation, produced through a student-faculty research project with Julia Gabriel ’22 (psychology), Mallory Anderson ’22 (psychology), Samantha Paradise ’22 (psychology), Sophie Stranick ’24 (psychology and criminal justice), Shelby Anderson ’21 (psychology), and Amber Kintzer ’21, M’22 (psychology and master of business administration), noted that “High levels of grit were related to having positive self-esteem/worth, strong habits of mind, good metacognitive awareness, and aging.”

Dr. Whiteley Conducts Research in Ireland

Dr. Kathryn Whiteley, associate professor of criminal justice, continued to research incarcerated women sentenced for murder during a recent return trip to Dublin, Ireland. While there she spoke to women incarcerated in the Dochas Centre women’s prison and met with Mary O’Connor, former prison governor of the Dochas Centre, Louise O’Connor, former chief officer, and Patricia Kelleher, assistant governor of the Mountjoy male prison. 

Dr. Whiteley Guest Lectures at Middle Tennessee State University

Dr. Kathryn M. Whiteley, associate professor of criminal justice, was a guest speaker for a Women and Crime class at Middle Tennessee State University. Dr. Whiteley discussed her book chapter, I am more than a crime, current research, and documentary about women incarcerated for murder in SCI. Muncy, Pennsylvania. Students read her chapter, which was published in “Demystifying the Big House: Exploring Prison Experience and Media Representations (2018), and the class watched her 2021 documentary, “Until We Have Faces.”

Dr. Whiteley Appears as Expert on Australian Television

Dr. Kathryn M. Whiteley, associate professor of criminal justice and international expert on the study of women who kill, was a recent guest on one of the most highly watched programs across Australia, Channel Nine Australia’s Under Investigation: with Liz Hayes series. Dr. Whiteley appears just past the 22-minute mark of the Adultery, Murder, and Mayhem: The Scandalous Crime Unsolved for 30 Years.

Dr. Whiteley’s Documentary Goes Live and Presented at YAP

Dr. Kathryn M. Whiteley,associate professor of criminal justice, officially launched her documentary, “Until We Have Faces,” to purchase or rent online. The documentary also was presented to the director, senior management, and various key staff of the Youth Advocate Program (YAP), Lebanon, on August 12. The goal is to use the documentary as a course template (educational resource) to facilitate/teach/share the personal experiences of women serving life in SCI Muncy Pennsylvania with Central Pennsylvania female youth.

Dr. Alladin Co-Authors Research Published in National Journal

Dr. Terrence Alladin, assistant professor of criminal justice, and a colleague published “Immigrant and Citizen Reincarceration in Pennsylvania” in the American Journal of Criminal Justice earlier this month. Alladin and his co-author note “Despite numerous studies debunking the association between immigrants and crime, many residents in Pennsylvania continue to associate immigration with criminal offending…” along with other findings. 

Dr. Whiteley Serves as U.S. Department of Education Guest and Panelist

Dr. Kathryn M. Whiteley, associate professor of criminal justice, was a guest, discussion panelist for LINCS: Literacy Information and Communication System, a national initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education. Under the banner of Correctional and Re-Entry Education, Whiteley shared “Teaching Incarcerated Individuals with Long Sentences,” with the principal from the Women’s State Correctional Institute at Muncy, Pa. The duo discussed educational instructional practices for women serving long, life, and life without parole.

Dr. Whiteley Shares Research and Documentary with DOC Secretary

Dr. Kathryn Whiteley, chair of the Department of Social Science and associate professor of criminal justice, met with Pennsylvania’s Correction Secretary John Wetzel and other senior Department of Corrections (DOC) administrators in December at the DOC’s headquarters in Mechanicsburg. Whiteley discussed her research about women incarcerated for life and life without parole. She also previewed her documentary, “Until We Have Faces,” and participated in a Q&A session with the DOC leadership afterward.

 

Dr. Whiteley Previews Her Documentary in Atlanta

Dr. Kathryn Whiteley, chair of the Department of Social Science and associate professor of criminal justice, previewed her recently released documentary, “Until We Have Faces,” in Atlanta, Ga., this past December. Whiteley, who also held a Q&A session afterward, shared her “portrait that looks through the eyes of women incarcerated” during the Association for Justice-Involved Females and Organizations national conference.